Avatar: The Legend Of Aang - Into The Inferno (Wii) Reviews

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Avatar: The Legend Of Aang - Into The Inferno (Wii)

By: Rex Inego | Nov 06, 2008 05:48 PM

Avatar: Into the Inferno is THQs third attempt at game based upon the hugely popular anime-style Nickelodeon hit. This game plays alongside the storyline in the cartoon's latest episodes providing that kids will be entertained by what they get in terms of story without the feeling of being lost (ҡ la spin-off) or through seeing the games story in to many repeats of the cartoon.

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Using a fairly sharp cel-shaded graphical style to accurately represent how the cartoon is presented works well. Characters are bright and bold with some slightly gritty environments designed to give a slightly mature edge for the game's (and franchise for that matter) early and pre-teen audience.

The tone of the graphics is well suited to a generally dark and mysterious storyline intertwined with comic happenings between the game's central characters of Aang, Katara, Sokka and in total it comes with seven playable characters. An extensive roster of characters all of which are well animated and have individual play styles as you use two pre-selected characters on each level. Players hit a direction on the d-pad to switch between these instantaneously.

The game opens with a Lost-style Previously on AvatarӔ intro, to wrap up for fans where the game will sit in the storyline, introducing an enemy or two and then settling you down to an injured Aang recovering. From here you're introduced to the basics as you fight aboard a captured vessel that the original owners seem keen to get back.



Static backgrounds are the main affair as Aang swiftly runs around each environment, although there are some examples detailed surroundings to help and engage the player with the Universe they have been let loose in. In some sections, players can voyage throughout the skies using Gliders. These sections are a fairly lacklustre affair with a horrible control method and bland graphics, and with these, boredom soon sets in.
Animation is smooth and consistent with Aang dancing around the enemies, using his weapon and elemental skills to dismiss them. Aang can use air, water, earth and fire to remove the enemy threat and there are some examples of environment use.

See a rock, Aang can use his earth abilities to move it and throw it at an enemy. Or, see some water and Aang can push it at his foes or freeze it and lob that instead. Aang is naturally talented at air bending and can create volumes of wind, to do this you simply hold down B and draw a circle with the Wii remote to generate an instant blasting tool. Aang can also freeze water, whereby shaking the nunchuk gives Aang ice with which to attack enemies with, or cool down environmental puzzles (like venting steam).

Aang is controlled using the control stick found on the nunchuk, which lets him jog around the environments with neat precision whilst leaving the Wii remote free to control the various elements. Using the airӔ ability, you can uncover coins hidden underneath objects which all animate accordingly. Using the various abilities, Aang will often have to over-come environmental puzzles.

Finding an element to use is the simple task of looking for items that shine (similarly to Resident Evil) and tapping the B button whilst holding the Wii remote cursor over the item. Aang then takes control of the element as its mapped onto the Wii remote. The Wii remote is the perfect way to control something unaffected by gravity in a three dimensional environment. A quick press of the Z button allows him to jump nimbly in the air.

Combat is relatively simple but allows for quick and frenzied play over a possible more complex combo and block style brawler. Enemies will group together and in larger groups, form circles around you, or will pin you into the corners. Boss battles are simply more of the same with tougher enemies.

The use of music and sound effects is pretty standard, the original cast of the television show reprise their roles for the game and music is simple which is in-keeping with the demographic. Sound effects are used often adding to the experience. Helpful during the static moments when travelling from one battle to the next. This might involve the sound of cannons or the sound of a rushing river nearby. On the other hand, the range of catchphrases muttered by characters during game play is extremely limited, IҒd heard Aangs entire library of lines in ten minutes and from then on they did become annoying.

Hidden in each level are three pieces of artwork which gets added to a gallery for later perusal. This feature was once exclusive to titles fighting the ғgames as art struggle, and now appears to be a general inclusion. A nice one at that.



However, clocking in at around five or six hours and possibly seven or eight if you go for all of the hidden concept art, its not the Wiis biggest adventure. <br ">http://www.verdicts.co.uk/file/pic/review/review/607_s35378_wii_1.jpg' border='0' alt='' />

Using a fairly sharp cel-shaded graphical style to accurately represent how the cartoon is presented works well. Characters are bright and bold with some slightly gritty environments designed to give a slightly mature edge for the game's (and franchise for that matter) early and pre-teen audience.

The tone of the graphics is well suited to a generally dark and mysterious storyline intertwined with comic happenings between the game's central characters of Aang, Katara, Sokka and in total it comes with seven playable characters. An extensive roster of characters all of which are well animated and have individual play styles as you use two pre-selected characters on each level. Players hit a direction on the d-pad to switch between these instantaneously.

The game opens with a Lost-style Previously on AvatarӔ intro, to wrap up for fans where the game will sit in the storyline, introducing an enemy or two and then settling you down to an injured Aang recovering. From here you're introduced to the basics as you fight aboard a captured vessel that the original owners seem keen to get back.



Static backgrounds are the main affair as Aang swiftly runs around each environment, although there are some examples detailed surroundings to help and engage the player with the Universe they have been let loose in. In some sections, players can voyage throughout the skies using Gliders. These sections are a fairly lacklustre affair with a horrible control method and bland graphics, and with these, boredom soon sets in.
Animation is smooth and consistent with Aang dancing around the enemies, using his weapon and elemental skills to dismiss them. Aang can use air, water, earth and fire to remove the enemy threat and there are some examples of environment use.

See a rock, Aang can use his earth abilities to move it and throw it at an enemy. Or, see some water and Aang can push it at his foes or freeze it and lob that instead. Aang is naturally talented at air bending and can create volumes of wind, to do this you simply hold down B and draw a circle with the Wii remote to generate an instant blasting tool. Aang can also freeze water, whereby shaking the nunchuk gives Aang ice with which to attack enemies with, or cool down environmental puzzles (like venting steam).

Aang is controlled using the control stick found on the nunchuk, which lets him jog around the environments with neat precision whilst leaving the Wii remote free to control the various elements. Using the airӔ ability, you can uncover coins hidden underneath objects which all animate accordingly. Using the various abilities, Aang will often have to over-come environmental puzzles.

Finding an element to use is the simple task of looking for items that shine (similarly to Resident Evil) and tapping the B button whilst holding the Wii remote cursor over the item. Aang then takes control of the element as its mapped onto the Wii remote. The Wii remote is the perfect way to control something unaffected by gravity in a three dimensional environment. A quick press of the Z button allows him to jump nimbly in the air.

Combat is relatively simple but allows for quick and frenzied play over a possible more complex combo and block style brawler. Enemies will group together and in larger groups, form circles around you, or will pin you into the corners. Boss battles are simply more of the same with tougher enemies.

The use of music and sound effects is pretty standard, the original cast of the television show reprise their roles for the game and music is simple which is in-keeping with the demographic. Sound effects are used often adding to the experience. Helpful during the static moments when travelling from one battle to the next. This might involve the sound of cannons or the sound of a rushing river nearby. On the other hand, the range of catchphrases muttered by characters during game play is extremely limited, IҒd heard Aangs entire library of lines in ten minutes and from then on they did become annoying.

Hidden in each level are three pieces of artwork which gets added to a gallery for later perusal. This feature was once exclusive to titles fighting the ғgames as art struggle, and now appears to be a general inclusion. A nice one at that.



However, clocking in at around five or six hours and possibly seven or eight if you go for all of the hidden concept art, its not the Wiis biggest adventure. <br

Pros: - Great use of lice - Good use of cel-shading - Simple, intuitive combat - Nice controls - Good style - Suits key demographic well - Range of playable characters

cons: - A little on the short side - Puzzles are too easy - Not much incentive for replay, except to find concept art - Uninspiring music and sound effects

conclusion: A game built perfectly for fans and for those early or pre-teens, as it's central to the series storyline it may be essential but unless you're an avid Avatar junkie then you may want to avoid this. If your a fan of brawling games such as the X-Men Legends series then Avatar: The Legend of Aang - Into the Inferno will also hold some merit. For parents and guardians looking to this as stocking filler, it's budget price makes it the perfect choice if your children are glued to the Nickelodeon anim. In a word - FANtastic

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